CLOSE WINDOW


Schor, Juliet. The Overworked American: The Unexpected Decline of Leisure. New York: Basic Books, 1992 (247 pp.). This award-winning book looks not so much at the facts and statistics of the work phenomenon (that is, how many more hours we now work compared to previous generations), but at the value systems that drive us to work more. Schor argues that we need to exit the "squirrel cage" and take more time to spend with families, ourselves, and our communities. This book has caused many readers to think about their own values and work habits. The Overworked American is particularly useful for it historical overview of how work evolved – from a means to support basic needs to an instrument of consumerism and the "work-and-spend" cycle that now defines American capitalism. As an economist, Schor’s work falls in the same family as others like Herman Daly, and her later books and anthologies lean even more toward the sustainability category.


CLOSE WINDOW