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Drummond, Siobhan and Ian Yeoman (eds.). Quality Issues in Heritage Visitor Attractions. Oxford: Butterworth / Heinemann, 2001 (273 pp.). This anthology begins by examining the idea of quality in the service sector, primarily from a Total Quality Management (TQM) perspective, and then links this understanding to the heritage industry. Since quality tends to privilege customer satisfaction, the authors generally feel that museums and other heritage institutions must be more accommodating and entertaining – and less stuffy, static, and traditional. Intended primarily for heritage managers, the book applies the quality test to a number of institutional areas, such as organization, authenticity, visitor expectations, site management, product design, and staff training (including volunteers). Even if heritage sites are not actively participating in the tourism business, the principles outlined here would still help directors with general operations. As might be expected in an anthology, the essays are uneven; while most contributors demonstrate a deep understanding of the literature dealing with quality and service, some make the application to heritage more understandable and relevant, whereas others tend to remain preoccupied with the scholarship on quality. (They could be writing about running a donut shop, as well as a museum.) Perhaps the most useful section is the last, where the co-authors consider the future of heritage tourism and how quality control will figure in these new times. Citing demographic changes, social conditions, economic situations, and other factors, they note that there is not a great deal of literature extant on quality service and museums, although they do suggest that there is an important role for heritage sites to play in tourism’s future. As the postmodern, individualistic ethos becomes even more pronounced, people will continue to seek experiences that are novel, emotive, and informative – features that characterize many heritage institutions. But, warn the authors, museums and other sites will only capitalize on this interest if they meet their future audiences (who will be younger than current heritage travelers) halfway – with entertaining, challenging, relevant, multi-dimensional, multi-cultural, and experiential products and programs that serve the visitor’s need for reflection, inquiry, and self-discovery.


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